Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Poll: Future of civilization

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Poll: Future of civilization

    Between pandemics, climate change, nuclear weapons, AI and all the various other threats, what's chances human civilization survives to 2100?
    23
    100%, since we're smart and will figure things out in time
    17.39%
    4
    90%, almost a certainty
    34.78%
    8
    75%, pretty good odds still
    21.74%
    5
    50%, a tossup
    8.70%
    2
    33%, pretty lousy but possible
    8.70%
    2
    25%, odds stacked against civilization
    8.70%
    2
    10%, long odds, hard to find takers
    0%
    0
    0%, humans will survive, but live like 10,000 years ago
    0%
    0

  • #2
    Wish there was something between 90 and 100%. Asteroid effect and all. I need a 99.9% option.

    Comment


    • #3
      25%. The human response to climate change seems to be general denial and those who want to act can be shut down by political systems owned and operated by those who profit from blocking action.

      When the arctic tundra flips, releasing all that methane, it's curtains. When the oceans reach a certain tipping point of heat and acidity, it's curtains. When the CO2 levels reach a certain tipping point, it's curtains. Glacier and arctic ice-melt accelerating at an alarming rate (far worse than science predicted). Fresh water retreating on a global scale. Climate change already generating disaster after disaster (that Colorado fire was an astonishing anomaly, absolutely bizarre - nobody is talking about it). Protein source for billions (the sea) is rapidly breaking down (especially around SE Asia). There isn't enough land on the planet to grow enough soybeans to replace it. The world employs a massively destructive form of agriculture that's not changing anytime soon.

      Like Al Gore said years ago, people will start moving for water and food. (US should completely close its borders now). Imagine the Indus and Ganges rivers drying up?

      Meanwhile, as we can see, human democratic political systems all across the globe are beginning to teeter, replaced by more authoritarian leadership. America is ruled by a corporatist oligarchy whose central tenet is, "Greed is good." We can already see the plan of the billionaires; Build refuges, ie. "keeps" that they can escape to when the shit hits the fan. At sea, on land (Patagonia, anyone?), maybe even in space?

      I doubt that Homo sapiens gets completely wiped out. There will be small pockets here and there. Probably less than 100,000 world wide. They'll scour for whatever is left and then learn to survive on jellyfish and cockroaches. We are resilient, smart and omnivorous, after all.
      Last edited by Roh; 01-20-2022, 12:48 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Throw in a pandemic that is more lethal… it’s will happen again…

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by B-Large View Post
          Throw in a pandemic that is more lethal… it’s will happen again…
          Virologists have found the key: The way we blindly incorporate wildlife and domestic animals. There will be many more where omicron came from. I sometimes wonder if the Gaia theory might not be right...


          Click image for larger version

Name:	4384abc38df2c12f34224b2245feb861.jpg
Views:	273
Size:	77.9 KB
ID:	38064

          After all, science is just beginning to understand the human biome, and that appears to extensively govern the health of our bodies and minds. And we didn't even know about it until fairly recently. I went to a doctor a few years ago who chuckled, "Biome. That's some of that internet stuff." Got rid of that "doctor."

          Comment


          • #6
            Reminds me of mushrooms.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by OmegaBronco View Post
              Reminds me of mushrooms.
              Hallucinogenic or atomic?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Roh View Post

                Hallucinogenic or atomic?
                Guess.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Those of you who are so confident we'll be fine, why are you?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Roh View Post

                    Virologists have found the key: The way we blindly incorporate wildlife and domestic animals. There will be many more where omicron came from. I sometimes wonder if the Gaia theory might not be right...


                    Click image for larger version  Name:	4384abc38df2c12f34224b2245feb861.jpg Views:	18 Size:	77.9 KB ID:	38064

                    After all, science is just beginning to understand the human biome, and that appears to extensively govern the health of our bodies and minds. And we didn't even know about it until fairly recently. I went to a doctor a few years ago who chuckled, "Biome. That's some of that internet stuff." Got rid of that "doctor."
                    We're past wet markets and bushmeat. We're implanting animal organs into humans. The pig was raised in a sterile environment - which I doubt is 100% sterile. Let's mush a GMO pig and a human together. Nothing wrong can come of that.
                    Last edited by W*GS; 01-20-2022, 08:05 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Tned View Post
                      Wish there was something between 90 and 100%. Asteroid effect and all. I need a 99.9% option.
                      Why?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by W*GS View Post
                        Those of you who are so confident we'll be fine, why are you?
                        Click image for larger version

Name:	DpYfra6XgAAwvao.jpg
Views:	255
Size:	75.2 KB
ID:	38199.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by W*GS View Post
                          Those of you who are so confident we'll be fine, why are you?
                          Climate change is a hoax.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Roh View Post

                            Climate change is a hoax.
                            Those damn straws!!!


                            (meanwhile Untold hundreds of thousands of masks floating in the ocean).

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by The1percentKid View Post

                              Those damn straws!!!


                              (meanwhile Untold hundreds of thousands of masks floating in the ocean).
                              Click image for larger version

Name:	B_YeS9fVAAABDS4.jpg
Views:	237
Size:	42.5 KB
ID:	38355
                              😀

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Climate change: Top companies exaggerating their progress - study

                                Many of the world's biggest companies are failing to meet their own targets on tackling climate change, according to a study of 25 corporations.

                                They also routinely exaggerate or misreport their progress, the New Climate Institute report says.

                                Google, Amazon, Ikea, Apple and Nestle are among those failing to change quickly enough, the study alleges.

                                Corporations are under pressure to cut their environmental impact as more consumers want green products.

                                Some of the companies told BBC News they disagreed with some of the methods used in the report and said they were committed to taking action to curb climate change.

                                The firms analysed account for 5% of global greenhouse-gas emissions, the report says - which means although they have a huge carbon footprint, they have enormous potential to lead in the effort to limit climate change.

                                "The rapid acceleration of corporate climate pledges, combined with the fragmentation of approaches, means that it is more difficult than ever to distinguish between real climate leadership and unsubstantiated," the study says.

                                Study author Thomas Day told BBC News his team originally wanted to discover good practices in the corporate world, but they were "frankly surprised and disappointed at the overall integrity of the companies' claims".

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  As Colorado warms, dry soil sucks up more water. That’s bad news for rivers and farmers.
                                  Increasingly dry soils could spell big trouble for reservoirs, agriculture, forest health and pose greater risk of wildfire.

                                  John Stulp was born on the Eastern Plains. Fifty years ago he began farming with his father-in-law near Lamar. Together he and his wife, Jane, brought up five children in southeastern Colorado, raising cattle and dryland wheat.

                                  Along the way Stulp was elected as a Prowers County commissioner, and later served as Gov. Bill Ritter’s commissioner of agriculture and Gov. John Hickenlooper’s water policy adviser. When his service to the state was done in 2019, he headed back home to the prairie.

                                  But the prairie is changing.

                                  Winter wheat crops are becoming more unpredictable as hot, dry weather lasts longer. Where it once took 30 acres of pasture to support a cow and calf, it now takes 40 or more. As farming the prairie becomes a more marginal enterprise, ranchers are selling off cattle, farms are consolidating and families are leaving. Year after year, the area sets records: Driest summers. Driest winters. The last six months of 2021 were the hottest in Colorado’s recorded history, beating records set nearly a century ago in the Dust Bowl.

                                  “We’re in trouble,” said Stulp, 73. Wheat planted in the fall in anticipation of being watered by winter snow is performing poorly, he said.

                                  “The topsoil is so dried out, when we do get moisture, it doesn’t go very far. The wind sucks up the rest. It’s climate change, no question about it. If we get 3-4 degrees warmer like they say we might, it’ll look more like Albuquerque around here, and they don’t do a lot of farming around Albuquerque.”

                                  Meanwhile, in Colorado’s high country, scientists monitoring snowpack in the mountains are noticing a strange phenomenon: even in strong snowpack years, it’s translating into less spring runoff into rivers and streams, as soils left parched by long stretches of hot weather drink first before any water runs on.

                                  With Colorado facing a warmer future, scientists are looking at how increasingly dry soils could spell big trouble for reservoirs, agriculture, forest health and pose greater risk of wildfire.
                                  This guy knows. Only clueless "conservatives" still deny.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    We're in the process of watching the creation of a vast desert all across North America. Within a hundred years, vast numbers of people are going to be on the move, and not only here.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Who cares

                                      i drive a gas guzzler and love to litter. Sue me

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by Roh View Post
                                        We're in the process of watching the creation of a vast desert all across North America. Within a hundred years, vast numbers of people are going to be on the move, and not only here.
                                        All the heat waves, fires and droughts are the new normal for the Western United States, I'm afraid. Conversely, the East Coast is getting wetter, i.e., experiencing more hurricanes, heavy rains, flooding, etc. Someone (was it Maher?) had a good idea: why not build a pipeline to divert some of the surplus water from the Eastern U.S. to the West? We never seem to have a problem finding the funding for pipelines when they're for oil companies.

                                        Comment


                                        • cutthemdown
                                          cutthemdown commented
                                          Editing a comment
                                          A pipeline from the Ohio/Mississippi junction to Lake Powell makes sense IMO. The water could help grow more food, and generate more hydro power from all the damns on the Colorado river. But I also heard of a proposal for an underwater pipeline from southern Alaska to Washington. After that you connect it to the aqueduct. I think it has to be done and the price probably shouldn't matter.

                                      • #21
                                        Jesus is coming back. If you want to understand the progression and how it ends read Revelation.

                                        Comment


                                        • #22
                                          Originally posted by L.A. BRONCOS FAN View Post

                                          All the heat waves, fires and droughts are the new normal for the Western United States, I'm afraid. Conversely, the East Coast is getting wetter, i.e., experiencing more hurricanes, heavy rains, flooding, etc. Someone (was it Maher?) had a good idea: why not build a pipeline to divert some of the surplus water from the Eastern U.S. to the West? We never seem to have a problem finding the funding for pipelines when they're for oil companies.
                                          I've thought of that myself. Why not? The Romans built aqueducts across vast distances. We could sure as hell build a tunnel from Lake Michigan to Colorado. Then, pump that water up into the headwaters of the Colorado River and you supply the entire West. Someday, it will happen.

                                          Comment


                                          • cutthemdown
                                            cutthemdown commented
                                            Editing a comment
                                            From what reading I did, they were saying from the spot where the Ohio and Mississippi rivers meet would be the best spot. Also, heard of one proposal that brought water from Alaska. We should do it. It transcends politics IMO. We all know that water is the most important commodity we have.

                                        • #23
                                          Originally posted by Roh View Post

                                          Click image for larger version

Name:	B_YeS9fVAAABDS4.jpg
Views:	237
Size:	42.5 KB
ID:	38355
                                          😀

                                          Now THAT'S sarcasm.

                                          Comment


                                          • #24
                                            Diverting water from the Great Lakes to the Western US or elsewhere will undoubtedly bring about a big legal challenge that hits an international scale with Canada.

                                            Comment


                                            • #25
                                              Originally posted by Requiem View Post
                                              Diverting water from the Great Lakes to the Western US or elsewhere will undoubtedly bring about a big legal challenge that hits an international scale with Canada.
                                              I suppose they could try desalinization, but that gets very expensive. And what do you do with all the salt?

                                              Comment


                                              • cutthemdown
                                                cutthemdown commented
                                                Editing a comment
                                                Tequila shots? Desalinization would require nuclear energy to be cost-effective.
                                            Working...
                                            X